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A new book by Rabbi Shai Har-El on “Where Islam and Judaism Join Together”

Gate-of-Mercy JerusalemAn interesting new book on Jewish-Muslim relations by author, Shai Har-El. When asked how his book will help Jews and Muslims to appreciate their common bonds Har-El replies:

I wrote my book in a spirit of harmony and brotherhood. I treated it as a place, where I attempt to bridge between Islam and Judaism, and as a tool to promote a greater understanding and appreciation of these two Abrahamic traditions. The book is a sincere effort to go back to our sacred texts and reinterpret their teachings so that an open space is created to embrace religious pluralism and respect of other people’s truths. I chose to concentrate only on Islam and Judaism, sister religions that I believe are closely related to one another with roots intertwined in the land, in the language, and in the memories of shared history. The book demonstrates how, of all religions, they are by far the closest to each other in their fundamental religious tenets, practices and systems of law, and their social, cultural and ethical traditions. – See more at: http://islamicommentary.org/2014/05/rabbi-shai-har-el-on-where-islam-and-judaism-join-together-book-q-a/#sthash.3nYVehGg.dpuf

I wrote my book in a spirit of harmony and brotherhood. I treated it as a place, where I attempt to bridge between Islam and Judaism, and as a tool to promote a greater understanding and appreciation of these two Abrahamic traditions. The book is a sincere effort to go back to our sacred texts and reinterpret their teachings so that an open space is created to embrace religious pluralism and respect of other people’s truths. I chose to concentrate only on Islam and Judaism, sister religions that I believe are closely related to one another with roots intertwined in the land, in the language, and in the memories of shared history. The book demonstrates how, of all religions, they are by far the closest to each other in their fundamental religious tenets, practices and systems of law, and their social, cultural and ethical traditions.

Full article here

 

I wrote my book in a spirit of harmony and brotherhood. I treated it as a place, where I attempt to bridge between Islam and Judaism, and as a tool to promote a greater understanding and appreciation of these two Abrahamic traditions. The book is a sincere effort to go back to our sacred texts and reinterpret their teachings so that an open space is created to embrace religious pluralism and respect of other people’s truths. I chose to concentrate only on Islam and Judaism, sister religions that I believe are closely related to one another with roots intertwined in the land, in the language, and in the memories of shared history. The book demonstrates how, of all religions, they are by far the closest to each other in their fundamental religious tenets, practices and systems of law, and their social, cultural and ethical traditions. – See more at: http://islamicommentary.org/2014/05/rabbi-shai-har-el-on-where-islam-and-judaism-join-together-book-q-a/#sthash.3nYVehGg.dpu
I wrote my book in a spirit of harmony and brotherhood. I treated it as a place, where I attempt to bridge between Islam and Judaism, and as a tool to promote a greater understanding and appreciation of these two Abrahamic traditions. The book is a sincere effort to go back to our sacred texts and reinterpret their teachings so that an open space is created to embrace religious pluralism and respect of other people’s truths. I chose to concentrate only on Islam and Judaism, sister religions that I believe are closely related to one another with roots intertwined in the land, in the language, and in the memories of shared history. The book demonstrates how, of all religions, they are by far the closest to each other in their fundamental religious tenets, practices and systems of law, and their social, cultural and ethical traditions. – See more at: http://islamicommentary.org/2014/05/rabbi-shai-har-el-on-where-islam-and-judaism-join-together-book-q-a/#sthash.3nYVehGg.dpuf  For the full article in a Q&A session with the author follow this link:
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Rabbi Michael Lerner on a Different Approach to the Israel-Palestine Conflict

In this book Rabbi Michael Lerner offers his thoughts on finding a peaceful solution to the conflict. Embracing Israel/Palestine: A Strategy to Heal and Transform the Middle East

Book description

“A major modern conundrum is how the Arab/Israel conflict remains unresolved and, seemingly, unresolvable. In this inspirational book, Rabbi Michael Lerner suggests that a change in consciousness is crucial. With clarity and honesty, he examines how the mutual demonization and discounting of each sides’ legitimate needs drive the debate, and he points to new ways of thinking that can lead to a solution.
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Shalom Salam Bookstore

A River Flows from Eden: The Language of Mystical Experience in the Zohar I’ve added some more books to the Shalom Salam bookstore and several new categories such as Kabbalah and Jewish-Sufi dialogue. The link is in the blogroll over to the right or click here. The image on the left is of a book by Melila Hellner-Eshed, A River flows from Eden: The Language of Mystical experience in the Zohar. The following is an excerpt of which you can read more by clicking on the image.

Excerpt: The Zohar is the jewel in the crown of Jewish mystical literature. It is unparalleled in terms of its acceptance, sanctity, and influence on the consciousness of generations of Jews–and all this despite its apparently sudden appearance toward the end of the thirteenth century. Its mysterious style, and the unique mystical-religious dimension it offered Jewish life, quickly captured the hearts and minds of its readers. The mythical-erotic creativity that burst forth from its pages turned the Zohar into a world unto itself. Its surprising interpretations of biblical verses resonated in the souls of many, along with its deep insights into the human psyche–in both joy and grief.

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